Archive for the ‘Vol14-No4’ Category

Volume 14, Number 4, December 2011

Friday, December 30th, 2011

Contents:

From the Editor
Port Control Protocol
Challenges of DNS Scaling
Networking @ Home
IETF Tools
Fragments
Call For Papers
 
 
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Vol 14, No 4 Forum

From the Editor

Friday, December 30th, 2011


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Port Control Protocol

Friday, December 30th, 2011

by Dan Wing

After the transition to Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), hosts will often be behind IPv6 firewalls. But before the transition, mobile wireless devices will want to reduce their keepalive messages, and hosts of all sorts will share IPv4 addresses using a variety of address-sharing technologies. To meet these needs, the IETF formed the Port Control Protocol Working Group in August 2010 to define a new protocol for hosts to communicate with such devices. The initial output of this Working Group is the Port Control Protocol (PCP)[1]. Interoperability between two independently developed implementations of PCP was demonstrated at the IETF meeting in July 2011, highlighting the importance of this protocol to the industry. After it becomes a standard, PCP is expected to be deployed in various operating systems, IPv6 home gateways, IPv4 home gateways (Network Address Translators [NATs]), mobile third- and fourth-generation (3G and 4G, respectively) gateways (Gateway GPRS Support Nodes [GGSNs]), and Carrier-Grade NATs (CGNs).

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Infrastructure Challenges to DNS Scaling

Friday, December 30th, 2011

by Bill Manning

This article looks a few steps beyond the Root Scaling Study report from 2009.[1] In 2009, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) board commissioned a report to evaluate the effect of scaling the root zone from its current size to an undefined but larger root zone. Attributes considered were Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC), Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), Internationalized Domain Names (IDNs), and a larger number of entries in the zone. The report itself focused on the editorial processes and presentation of the finished root zone to the greater Internet. The report concluded that with prudence and with the addition of some “watch & warn” systems in place, the root zone could accommodate adding IPv6, DNSSEC, and IDNs along with other new Top-Level Domain (TLD) entries in a controlled manner. What the report did not consider was the effects of the deployed Internet infrastructure on the ability to get this new information into the rest of the Domain Name System (DNS) infrastructures of the Internet. Early experimental evidence[7, 8] suggests that the current state of infrastructure deployment will create problems for the deployment of these attributes.

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Networking @ Home

Friday, December 30th, 2011

by Geoff Huston

One of the more interesting sessions at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) meeting in Quebec City in July 2011 was the first meeting of the recently established Homenet Working Group[1]. What is so interesting about networking the home? Well, if you regard challenges as “interesting,” then just about everything is interesting when you look at networking in the home!

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IETF Tools—Making It Easier to Make the Internet Work Better

Friday, December 30th, 2011

by Robert Sparks

Many activities are associated with defining and refining an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) protocol, and all of them are detail-oriented. As IETF Working Groups are formed, mailing list discussions proceed, documents are written and reviewed, and interoperability is evaluated, participants encounter tasks that can be significantly simplified with the help of software tools. Fortunately, those participants frequently are also skilled software developers, and they create and share these tools as the need arises. A new paradigm has evolved recently: When a pressing need for a tool is identified—particularly one that has a large scope—the IETF Administrative Oversight Committee (IAOC) accelerates the creation of the tool by working with the community to gather requirements and financing the development of a solution. Comprehensive lists of available tools are maintained at [1] and at [2]. This article introduces a few important tools and discusses how you can help improve them or develop new ones.

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Fragments

Friday, December 30th, 2011

Professor Kilnam Chon Receives 2011 Postel Service Award
Alexandre Cassen and Rémi Després Receives 2011 Itojun Service Award
Internet Society Joins Opposition to Stop Online Piracy Act
APNIC and JPRS Collaborate to Translate DNSSEC Technology Experiment Report
RFC Series Editor Appointment
2011 Global IPv6 Survey Results
The Public Switched Telephone Network in Transition
Upcoming Events

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Call for Papers

Friday, December 30th, 2011

The Internet Protocol Journal (IPJ) is published quarterly by Cisco Systems. The journal is not intended to promote any specific products or services, but rather is intended to serve as an informational and educational resource for engineering professionals involved in the design, development, and operation of public and private internets and intranets. The journal carries tutorial articles (“What is…?”), as well as implementation/operation articles (“How to…”). It provides readers with technology and standardization updates for all levels of the protocol stack and serves as a forum for discussion of all aspects of internetworking.

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